Exiting Route 66

As with all of our other rooms pre-renovation, this room screamed 90’s in the worst way. This room was originally designed as a game room with our pool table. The before pictures just don’t do this Route 66 themed room justice. Picture floor to ceiling plaid wallpaper, a license plate border, then continuing a lovely hunter green wallpaper to cover the ceiling. Complete with Route 66 curtains, chairs, everything! Even a Route 66 gift store employee would have said, “I think that’s too much Route 66 stuff for one room.” We ditched the pool table and started planning for what would be our new craft room.

We stripped all the wall paper off inch by plaid-covered inch then had the professionals come in to texture the walls.

Our look for this room is light, vintage, and with slight rustic/industrial touches. We chose a medium grey, Requisite Grey, for the 20140113-201956.jpgwalls and a slightly darker Functional Grey for the ceilings. Both are Sherwin Williams colors. We added wood trim where the wall meets the ceiling for a more customized look (and so our paint line didn’t have to be spot on).

Storage was essential in this room. It was acquired in the form of wood shelving lined with baskets and containers of all shapes and sizes.

The closet was converted into a small office space with custom wood shelves held up by black steel pipe.

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A cheap flea market table was stripped of the bright blue spray paint and stained a dark walnut with antique white legs.

Overall, it’s a space that holds a nice mix of old and new, industrial and soft, and rustic and polished. It’s complete with family pictures, inherited treasures, and all things necessary for whatever creative project strikes us next.

 

Repurposed Antique Sewing Machine

This antique Singer sewing machine was passed down from my great grandmother. It’s gorgeous except for the front drawer that has always been missing. We decided to combat the missing piece while giving it an updated look by removing the wood top and replacing it with stained concrete. The concrete table top was made using our usual mold from melamine, but this time we added a decorative edge using a polyurethane edge form mold. The color was achieved from a mix of deep brown and buff grout stain that was left over from the bathroom countertop project. Removing the old top allowed more of the pretty iron work to show through, plus the actual sewing machine that was inside and never seen will look great in the craft room! The following pictures are the process start to finish…
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Welcoming Wreaths

I am great at recreating. The initial creation…not so much. This post serves the pure purpose of inspiration for those (like me) who just need a little nudge in where to go once you’ve purchased a wreath, 12 feet of burlap ribbon, $50 worth of fake flowers and now haven’t the slightest clue of how to put it all together. My friend, Christi, described the experience after a trip to Hobby Lobby best in that unloading your car is like last call at the bar; the lights are flipped on and nothing is quite as magical as it seemed. I cannot offer much insight or helpful tips in creating these wreaths other than to gather bits of colors and textures that you are drawn to, stick it all in a grapevine wreath piece by piece, and add a gigantic bow. I prefer to start from a bow on the side and work my way out. Attach your big pieces first then add in the filler. I would say that there is no wrong way to do it, but we all know that’s a lie. I find that with a grapevine wreath it’s easiest to just stick the stems in, no glue needed. So if all else fails and it looks like the sale aisle of Michaels just threw up, rip it all out and start from scratch. Lord knows I’ve done that more than once…

Garden Chandelier

We found this ugly old chandelier at a flea market, complete with inset candles and the greenery going around it.image
We saw the potential in it, snatched it up, and took the rest of the electrical out. Cheap solar lights were refitted where the bulbs would have gone. We just removed the plastic posts used to put the solar lights in the ground and hot glued the bulbs into the chandelier. By “We” I mean my mom. I found the chandelier at the flea market, but that’s where my creative input on this project ends. Some left over dangling crystals finish it off and it’s hung on our garden arbor as a whimsical addition to our backyard.


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